Aphasia and Frontotemporal Dementia: 10 Things to Know

What are Aphasia and Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD)? According to the Mayo Clinic, “aphasia is a rare nervous system syndrome that affects the ability to communicate,” and it is “a type of frontotemporal dementia.” Aphasia and FTD start early, and sometimes even earlier, from the age of 40-65. These degenerative and progressive disorders affect communication/language, behavior, and personality.

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Wendy Williams is Diagnosed with Aphasia and Frontotemporal Dementia: You may have heard, watched, or seen the latest Wendy Williams documentary on Lifetime. As soon as the documentary was about to be released, her care team released a statement confirming that Ms. Williams is now diagnosed with aphasia and frontotemporal dementia. What are Aphasia and Frontotemporal Dementia? According to the Mayo Clinic, "aphasia is a rare nervous system syndrome that affects the ability to communicate," and it is "a type of frontotemporal dementia." Aphasia starts early, mainly from the age of 65.

Wendy Williams is Diagnosed with Aphasia and Frontotemporal Dementia:

Unless you live under a rock, you may have heard, watched, or seen the latest Wendy Williams documentary on Lifetime. As soon as the documentary was about to be released, her care team released a statement confirming that Ms. Williams is now diagnosed with aphasia and frontotemporal dementia.

Who is Wendy Williams?

If you don’t live in the United States and haven’t watched American Daytime television since the end of C-19, you may not be familiar with Ms. Wendy Williams. Wendy Williams is an award-winning American Daytime TV host, a media personality, and a celebrity. She hosted a daytime TV show on Fox News, and the show was named after her “Wendy” from 2008 to 2021. Before hosting daytime television, she was a Radio DJ. Read more about Ms. Wendy Williams in this Wikipedia article.

I was entrusted into the warm, embracing arms of Ms. Williams when I landed in America. While waiting to get started with proper life here in America, I watched the morning television; well, hello. Even though I typically enjoy watching Good Morning America, I will enthusiastically switch to FOX News at 10.00 am EST to watch The Ms. Wendy Williams Show. I was shocked when I first watched Wendy; she is entertaining, funny, and witty. I was also surprised at how she bravely calls out celebrities without fear or favor. There was no show on American daytime television like Wendy.

Currently and sadly, Wendy Williams is only 59 years old and has been diagnosed with aphasia and frontotemporal dementia. She is now out of the limelight and under guardianship or (conservatorship), and her family doesn’t have access to her, allegedly.

Wendy Williams is Diagnosed with Aphasia and Frontotemporal Dementia: You may have heard, watched, or seen the latest Wendy Williams documentary on Lifetime. As soon as the documentary was about to be released, her care team released a statement confirming that Ms. Williams is now diagnosed with aphasia and frontotemporal dementia.
What are Aphasia and Frontotemporal Dementia? According to the Mayo Clinic, "aphasia is a rare nervous system syndrome that affects the ability to communicate," and it is "a type of frontotemporal dementia." Aphasia starts early, mainly from the age of 65.

What are Aphasia and Frontotemporal Dementia?

According to the Mayo Clinic “aphasia is a rare nervous system syndrome that affects the ability to communicate” and it is “a type of frontotemporal dementia.” Aphasia starts early, mainly from the age of 65. As it progresses, it causes the person not fully to comprehend written or spoken language. Learn more from this Mayo Clinic article.

Frontotemporal dementia, aka FTD, “is a general cause of dementia” and like aphasia, the frontotemporal dementia is degenerative and progresses slowly. It occurs when several nerves/cells in the frontal and temporal lobes are missing. Frontotemporal dementia “can affect behavior, personality, language, and movement” – John Hopkins Medicine. FTD affects men and women alike and can start early between the ages of 40 and 65. It can also start early.

Wendy Williams is Diagnosed with Aphasia and Frontotemporal Dementia: You may have heard, watched, or seen the latest Wendy Williams documentary on Lifetime. As soon as the documentary was about to be released, her care team released a statement confirming that Ms. Williams is now diagnosed with aphasia and frontotemporal dementia.
What are Aphasia and Frontotemporal Dementia? According to the Mayo Clinic, "aphasia is a rare nervous system syndrome that affects the ability to communicate," and it is "a type of frontotemporal dementia." Aphasia starts early, mainly from the age of 65 but frontotemporal dementia (FTD) could start between 40-65 years.

What is the Difference Between Aphasia and Frontotemporal Dementia?

It’s a bit hard to make a clear distinction between aphasia and frontotemporal dementia because aphasia is the loss of communication or language disorder likely caused by frontotemporal dementia, for instance, in the case of Ms. Wendy Williams. Though some people may have aphasia without dementia, it is not generally so. Remember that though these conditions differ, both involve and impact language/communication. Both are degenerative and progressive. Please keep reading to learn more about aphasia and FTD.

The 10 Things to Know About Primary Progressive Aphasia:

  1. Aphasia is a degenerative, progressive disorder. However, it progresses slowly; the person suffering from this disorder may still be able to care for themselves for several years into the future without needing help.
  2. The symptoms of primary aphasia may vary because they depend on the affected part of the brain. Additionally, there are three types of progressive primary aphasia, each with different symptoms. As the name suggests, the symptoms are progressive and develop over time. 
  3. This disorder causes problems comprehending spoken and written words.
  4. The disorder may cause difficulty in completing sentences, causing pauses and hesitation while searching for words.
  5. This disorder may cause errors in sentences.
  6. People who have dyslexia in childhood may be at a higher risk of developing primary progressive aphasia.
  7. This disorder may run in the family. Rare genes have also been linked to it, suggesting it may be hereditary. 
  8. Eventually, people with aphasia will lose the ability to talk and write, suffering apraxia of speech.
  9. Going through this is a harrowing ordeal that will result in mental health struggles. Some people may suffer depression. 
  10. “Primary progressive aphasia is a type of frontotemporal dementia” – Mayo Clinic
Wendy Williams is Diagnosed with Aphasia and Frontotemporal Dementia: You may have heard, watched, or seen the latest Wendy Williams documentary on Lifetime. As soon as the documentary was about to be released, her care team released a statement confirming that Ms. Williams is now diagnosed with aphasia and frontotemporal dementia.
What are Aphasia and Frontotemporal Dementia? According to the Mayo Clinic, "aphasia is a rare nervous system syndrome that affects the ability to communicate," and it is "a type of frontotemporal dementia." Aphasia starts early, mainly from the age of 65, but frontotemporal dementia (FTD) could start between 40 and 65 years.

See this Mayo Clinic article for more info on aphasia.

The 10 Things to Know About Progressive Frontotemporal Dementia:

  1. The cause of frontotemporal dementia is currently unknown, though a family history of dementia is a possible risk factor. 
  2. Frontotemporal dementia is likely to occur at a younger age.
  3. FTD, or frontotemporal dementia, affects language, behavior, personality, and movement.
  4. Frontotemporal dementia is a progressive disorder, occurring slowly, though sometimes quickly. 
  5. Some common types of FTD include the Frontal variant and Primary progressive aphasia.
  6. A single test cannot diagnose FTD; it is typically through a series of medical exams, including blood tests, neurological assessments, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRIs), Computed Tomography (CT) scans, etc. 
  7. There is no cure for FTD, and there isn’t anything that can help slow it down, either. Most often, healthcare providers may prescribe medications that can help manage the symptoms. 
  8. People can live with FTD as it isn’t a life-threatening disease; however, as it progresses, it worsens, and sufferers may end up requiring 24-hour care. Assisted living or nursing homes are an option for 24-hour nursing care.
  9. Managing your mental health is essential, as this health diagnosis may cause anxiety and depression. 
  10. Find a healthcare provider knowledgeable about frontotemporal dementia or go to a specialist. 
Wendy Williams is Diagnosed with Aphasia and Frontotemporal Dementia: You may have heard, watched, or seen the latest Wendy Williams documentary on Lifetime. As soon as the documentary was about to be released, her care team released a statement confirming that Ms. Williams is now diagnosed with aphasia and frontotemporal dementia.
What are Aphasia and Frontotemporal Dementia? According to the Mayo Clinic, "aphasia is a rare nervous system syndrome that affects the ability to communicate," and it is "a type of frontotemporal dementia." Aphasia starts early, mainly from the age of 65, but frontotemporal dementia (FTD) could start between 40 and 65 years.

See this Johns Hopkins Medicine article for more info on frontotemporal dementia.

Brain-Healthy Foods for Aphasia and Frontotemporal and Dementia:

Healthy nutrition plays a role in most situations, including managing the symptoms of these disorders. Here are some brain-healthy foods that are great for people suffering from aphasia and frontotemporal dementia.

Wendy Williams is Diagnosed with Aphasia and Frontotemporal Dementia: You may have heard, watched, or seen the latest Wendy Williams documentary on Lifetime. As soon as the documentary was about to be released, her care team released a statement confirming that Ms. Williams is now diagnosed with aphasia and frontotemporal dementia.
What are Aphasia and Frontotemporal Dementia? According to the Mayo Clinic, "aphasia is a rare nervous system syndrome that affects the ability to communicate," and it is "a type of frontotemporal dementia." Aphasia starts early, mainly from the age of 65, but frontotemporal dementia (FTD) could start between 40 and 65 years.

The bottom line about what foods to eat is prioritizing healthier, less processed foods. When in doubt about what recipes to make, follow the Mediterranean diet. For inspiration, see this spring mix salad, and beetroot salad. Also, quinoa fried rice, cauliflower cilantro lime rice, and blueberry spinach salad are excellent.

On the other hand, avoid too much salt, sugar, and alcohol.

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Wendy Williams is Diagnosed with Aphasia and Frontotemporal Dementia: You may have heard, watched, or seen the latest Wendy Williams documentary on Lifetime. As soon as the documentary was about to be released, her care team released a statement confirming that Ms. Williams is now diagnosed with aphasia and frontotemporal dementia. What are Aphasia and Frontotemporal Dementia? According to the Mayo Clinic, "aphasia is a rare nervous system syndrome that affects the ability to communicate," and it is "a type of frontotemporal dementia." Aphasia starts early, mainly from the age of 65.

THANKS FOR STOPPING BY! Stay well, safe and keep living your life to the fullest!

Nkechi Ajaeroh's blog nkechiajaeroh.com for healthy food recipes, and healthy living. tips.

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